Free Family Devotion Resource

Since the Coronavirus is keeping families at home, I’m offering free family devotions for children’s pastors to distribute to parents of their students. These devotions are from Building Foundations Curriculum and are copyrighted. They are only meant as a free resource during this time. Do not sell or publish this resource.

I will be distributing one week of devotions every Friday. The first series of devotions comes from The Journey: The Road (A series on the Romans Road).

© mtzionridgepress, 2019

 

The Road Lesson 2: The Wide Road and the Narrow Road Family Devotion Handout

Memory Verse:  Romans 6:23   For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Summary: In our society today, there are few consequences for sin. Politicians can break the law and still hold office. Sports figures are idolized no matter how they live their personal lives. Actors and actresses can live an ungodly life style and be praised for it. But with God, sin leads to eternal death. God doesn’t wink at sin, but He does provide a way of escape and eternal life through Jesus Christ. Sadly, most people will choose death.

This sheet is provided to help families with devotions to go with the lessons your children learned in children’s church this week. Included is a daily Bible reading to use for discussions.

Monday: Read Matthew 7:13-14. The wide path leads to death. The narrow path leads to life. Choose life.

Tuesday: Read 1 Samuel 13:1-15. King Saul was a bad king because he thought more of what the people wanted than what God wanted.

Wednesday: Read 1 Samuel 15:10-26. The consequences of King Saul constantly disobeying God was that he lost his kingdom.

Thursday: Read Acts 13:21-22. God gave the kingdom to David because he was a man after God’s own heart.

Friday: Read Psalm 51. One reason God choose David is because he repented of his sins.

Saturday: Read Deuteronomy 30:19. We each have a choice between life and death. God urges us to choose life.

Family Activity: Set up narrow spaces in your house or backyard to crawl through. Then go to an open area outside and have the children run. Ask your children if it was harder to crawl through those spaces than to run in the open area. Talk about how it is easier to go on a wide path, but God wants us to go on the narrow path.

Free Resources for Family Devotions

Since the Coronavirus is keeping families at home, I’m offering free family devotions for children’s pastors to distribute to parents of their students. These devotions are from Building Foundations Curriculum and are copyrighted. They are only meant as a free resource during this time. Do not sell or publish this resource.

I will be distributing one week of devotions every Friday. The first series of devotions comes from The Journey: The Road (A series on the Romans Road).

© mtzionridgepress, 2019

 

The Road Lesson 1 – Out of Eden Family Devotions Handout

Memory Verse: Romans 3:23 For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.

Summary: Have you ever heard that all people are good inside? The theory is since everyone starts out good, all we have to do is train children and treat them right, and they’ll do good.

That’s not what the Bible says. According to the Bible, everyone is born into sin. We have all sinned. You don’t have to teach a child to lie, or steal, or disobey. It comes naturally. We can’t be good enough to go to Heaven. We have accept Jesus and His forgiveness to take care of our sin problem.

This sheet is provided to help families with devotions to go with the lessons your children learned in children’s church this week. Included is a daily Bible reading to use for discussions.

Monday: Read Genesis 2. When God created Adam and Eve, He called them very good. They lived in Eden and had fellowship with God. God only had one command.

Tuesday: Read Genesis 3. Adam and Eve disobeyed God, and sin came into the world.

Wednesday: Read Romans 3:10-20. Our hearts are bent toward sinning.

Thursday: Read Romans 3:21-26. God has made a way to redeem us from our sin.

Friday: Read I John 1:7-9. To take advantage of God’s forgiveness, we need to confess our sin to Him.

Saturday: Read Romans 6. Once Christ has forgiven us, we should consider ourselves dead to sin.

Family Activity: Road Trip

Go on a pretend road trip with your children. If they are younger, have them use their toy cars during this trip. Have them describe where they would go and what they would see along the way.

Make sure you point out the guardrails. Talk about how guardrails keep us safe from dangers. Talk about your family rules and how they are guardrails to protect your children from danger.

Ask the children what guardrails they can have in their lives to keep them safe from the temptation to sin. Avoid giving them a list of rules. Instead, encourage them to decide what changes they need to make.

Coronavirus in Children’s Ministry

Coronavirus is a concern all across the world. Because of this, I wanted to give you some information concerning the Coronavirus in children’s ministry.

First, don’t allow fear to grip your heart. God has this under control even if we don’t understand. The Bible is full of instances where God tells us not to fear. One such passage is in Psalm 91:1-4. 

He who dwells in the secret place of the Most High shall abide under the shadow of the Almighty. I will say of the Lord, “He is my refuge and my fortress; My God, in Him I will trust.”

Surely He shall deliver you from the snare of the fowler. And from the perilous pestilence. He shall cover you with His feathers,
And under His wings you shall take refuge; His truth shall be your shield and buckler.
While we don’t allow ourselves to fear, we do need to take common sense measures.

If your church is having services:

  • Disinfect children’s areas with Clorox type wipes or disinfectant spray.
  • Have hand sanitizer at the door of every children’s room. Sanitize going in and going out.
  • During restroom breaks, teach your students how to properly wash their hand while singing Jesus Loves Me.
  • Do not allow any child with a fever, coughs, or congestion to attend.

If your church is not having services:

  • Keep in contact with your students via phone calls.
  • Use Facebook to give your student short messages or object lessons.
  • Send suggestions for children’s Bible studies or family activities to parents.
  • Keep parents informed.

No matter what your church has decided, teach your students the power of prayer over fear.

Building Foundations Curriculum 50% Off Black Friday – Cyber Monday

On Sale at this link.

The Real History of the Pilgrims

 Thanksgiving is coming soon, and most children’s pastors have special Thanksgiving services planned. One thing I have always done on Thanksgiving is to teach the children about America’s spiritual heritage ingrained in the Pilgrims and Puritans. These are some of the facts that children are not taught in school.

Most children are taught that pilgrims came to America to flee religious persecution. That’s not exactly true. Pilgrims and Puritans were persecuted for believing that Christians could have a personal relationship with Jesus separate from the Church of England. But they traveled to Holland to flee the persecution, not America.

So why did they travel to America? There were many reasons, but the main reason is they felt compelled by God to come to America and establish a colony of people that honored God. Many called this colony, New Jerusalem, believing that God had established this new land to spread the gospel to the world. William Bradford wrote in his journal that the motivation came from “a great hope for advancing the kingdom of Christ.”

Pilgrims and Puritans were not the same. Pilgrims were separatists who believed they should separate themselves for the Church of England and the world systems. Puritans believed in working within the system. When they came to America, Puritans wished to set up the government so that religious freedom of expression would be established. Pilgrims wanted freedom of religion so they were free to worship without fear of persecution. Both Pilgrims and Puritans wanted freedom of religion to protect the church from the government, not to protect the government from the church.

Many schools teach that Thanksgiving was a secular celebration. But letters written by the Pilgrims tell a different story. God was such a part of their everyday life that they included God in everything. One such letter states that Thanksgiving was a celebration called so that “God be praised” for what He had brought them through.

John Winthrop called New England a City on a Hill in one of his sermon. He, as well as many other Puritans and Pilgrims, believed they had made a covenant with God to be a new nation that was a model of Christianity to the world. William Bradford believed that America was called to spread the gospel to the world. Since the Pilgrims and Puritans came to America, the United States of America has sent missionaries to more nations and more remote places in the world than any other nation on Earth. Could it be they were right?