Category Archives: Object Lessons

Easter Object Lessons

Here’s some links for Easter object lessons and stories to help you plan your message Resurrection Sunday.

The Curtain Was Torn

Salvation Gospel Illusion

What’s Easter All About?

The Colors of Easter

He Paid the Price

The Empty Egg

Palm Sunday Free Kidmin Lesson

Jesus with childrenPalm Sunday is this Sunday. Here’s a lesson that you can use to make the day powerful.

Theme: God Wants Children To Praise Him

Verse: Matthew 21:16 (NIV) … From the lips of children and infants you, Lord, have called forth your praise

Game: Pin the Tail on the Donkey

You can buy this at most party supply stores.

After playing the game a few times, talk to the children about how Jesus rode to Jerusalem on a donkey.

Activity: Palm Branch Limbo

To play “Palm Branch Limbo,” you will need a few palm branches. These branches are easily found in department stores and floral shops weeks leading up to Palm Sunday. The children will have to limbo under the palm branches while the other children around them cheer them on.

Remind the children of how palm branches were placed in front of Jesus as the crowd around Him cheered Him on and shouted praises to Him.

Bible Story: Jesus Enters Jerusalem (Matthew 21:1-17)

You can assign children parts and have them act out this story.

When Jesus entered Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, he rode in on a colt like a king. A colt is a young donkey. That means a child donkey held the full glory of God on his back. Child can have the full glory of God in them. You don’t have to wait until you’re grown up.

Everyone heard that Jesus was coming and ran out to meet Him. Some laid palm branches on the ground for Him to ride on. Others waved palm branches and shouted Hosanna, Son of David. They called Him Son of David because that was what they called the Messiah. They knew that the Messiah would have King David as an ancestor in His family tree. Hosanna means “save us” or “rescue us”. They were recognizing that Jesus is the Son of God who had come to save them. Imagine being in the crowd that day and waving palm branches to Jesus and shouting “Hosanna”.

After Jesus rode into Jerusalem, He went to the temple. There were men outside selling and cheating people. This made Jesus angry that these men would cheat people in the Temple of God. He knocked over their tables and said, “It is written, my house will be called a house of prayer. You have made it into a den of thieves.”

This made the religious leaders angry. They made money off these men who cheated the people.

At that point, children ran up to Jesus and waved palm shouting “Hosanna, Son of David.” Children, let’s use our hands to praise Jesus the way these children did. (Encourage the children to shout praises.)

Some of the religious leaders were angry that the children were praising Jesus. They said, “Do you hear what those children are saying? Tell them to be quiet.”

Jesus defended the children. He said, ““Have you never read,“‘From the lips of children and infants you, Lord, have called forth your praise?”

Jesus wants children to praise Him. (Encourage children to shout praises to God.)

Girl shows five fingers.Object Lesson: Wave Your Palms

When Jesus entered Jerusalem, children and adult grabbed palm branches to praise him with. We don’t always have palm branches around, but we can still praise Jesus with our palms. (Hold up your hands.) God created us with two palms we can always use to praise Him with. Let’s hold up our palms now and shout “Praise the Lord”.

Object Lesson: The Rocks Will Cry Out

Supplies Needed: rocks

If you have enough rocks, give a rock or pebble to each child to take home. Tell them to put it out some place to remind them to Praise the Lord.

Have any of you ever heard a rock talk? After the Pharisees tried to get Jesus to stop the children from praising Him, Jesus said something very interesting. He said if we don’t praise Him, the rocks will cry out praise.

(Show the rocks) Have any of you ever heard a rock speak? That was amazing what Jesus said. But if children hadn’t praised Him as the Messiah the day he entered Jerusalem, that’s just what would have happened. Rocks not only would have spoke, they would have cried out praises to God.

God still wants His children to praise Him. I don’t want the rocks to cry out my praise. I want to praise God with my own mouth.

Let’s do that right now. On the count of three, let’s all shout “Praise the Lord”.

child, kid, joy, faith, praise and happinessLesson: God Wants Children to Praise

Quote the memory verse for today’s lesson. Matthew 21:16 … From the lips of children and infants you, Lord, have called forth your praise

When Jesus said this, He said it in Hebrew. It was written down in Greek. And we quote the verse in English. What the verse really meant in the original language is that God taught children and babies to lead praise. That means that Jesus not only wants children to praise Him, He wants children to lead praise.

Have you ever seen a church that had children lead praise and worship in Big Church. Most churches normally have adults leading praise, but God wants children to lead praise. That doesn’t mean you have to join the adult praise team. But it does mean if you praise God with your whole heart, adults will see it and want to praise God too.

Ask the children to make a decision to praise God with their whole hearts. If you have time, lead them in another praise song and encourage them to praise God with their whole hearts while they sing it.

Craft Activity: Hand Palms

Supplies Needed: construction paper, craft (Popsicle) sticks, scissors

Have children trace their hand prints onto construction paper. Have them cut out the hand prints and glue them onto the craft sticks.

Remind the children that we made these palm branches to remind us that we all have palms to wave when we praise the Lord.

Christmas Tree Object Lessons and the Why the Christmas Tree is Christian

114-1013tm-cart-holidaysHaving Children decorate a Christmas tree in Children’s Church is a great way to teach about the birth of Christ. First teach them why we use the Christmas tree, then use the ornaments as object lessons.

 

Christmas Tree Object Lessons

So as you can see, the Christmas tree has always been a symbol of Christ. It can be used in a number of ways to teach children. Here’s a few object lessons you can use as your students decorate the tree.

Rick 2Apples: We hang apples from the Christmas tree because Adam and Eve sinned by eating the apple. Jesus came to Earth to save us from our sins.

Evergreen: Just as evergreen trees grow all year long and are always green, Jesus came to Earth to give us everlasting life.

Holly: The holly we hang on Christmas trees is red and reminds us of the blood Jesus shed to save us from our sins.

Moravian StarTree Top: The tree top is usually an angel or a star. Both were in the sky the night Jesus was born. The angels proclaimed the good news to the shepherds. The star lighted the way of wise men traveling to Bethlehem.

Lights: Jesus is the light of the world.

Ornaments: Round bulbs represent Jesus coming to Earth. Other ornaments represent that God wants to give us good things.

Tree: The tree itself can represent the tree of life that Jesus came to Earth to restore to us. It can also represent the cross where Jesus died for our sins. We cut down a tree for Christmas just as Christ was cut down for our sins. But we resurrect the tree in our homes just as Christ was resurrected after 3 day.

Wreath: Wreaths are a great symbol to teach children about Christmas. Wreaths are circular. This symbolizes eternal life. It can also symbolize God’s unending love. We usually hang wreaths on the door to welcome guests just as Jesus welcomes us to have eternal life in Him. Wreaths are made out of evergreen symbolizing again everlasting life in Christ.

The History of the Christmas Tree

Some believe the Christmas tree started during the Winter Solstice when Druids worshipped trees. But from the beginning, Christmas trees have been used as Christian symbols to teach about Christ.

The Upside Down Fir Tree

During the 7th century, a monk from Devonshire spent time there preaching the word of God. He used the triangular shape of the Fir tree to teach about the Trinity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. By the 12th century, the Fir tree was hung upside down from ceilings in Central Europe as a symbol of Christianity at Christmas time.

Boniface and Thor’s Oak

St. Boniface became a missionary to the Germans in the 700’s A.D where he encountered Druids who worshiped trees. To stop their sacrifices at their sacred Donar Oak near Geismar, St. Boniface chopped the tree down in 725 A.D. With one mighty blow, Saint Boniface felled the massive oak, and as the tree split, a beautiful young fir tree sprang from its center. Saint Boniface told the people that this lovely evergreen, with its branches pointing to heaven, was indeed a holy tree, the tree of the Christ Child, a symbol of His promise of eternal life. He instructed them to carry the evergreen from the wilderness into their homes and to surround it with gifts, symbols of love and kindness.

The Paradise Tree

From the eleventh Century, religious plays called “Mystery Plays” including the popular Paradise Play depicting the story of the creation of Adam and Eve, their sin, and thier banishment from Eden. An evergreen tree was used for this winter festival and decorated with apples symbolizing the forbidden fruit. The play ended with the promise of the coming Savior. Wafers were also hung from the tree symbolizing the forgiveness of sins in communion making it now not just the tree of knowledge but also the tree of life. This resulted in a very old European custom of decorating a fir tree in the home with apples and small white wafers representing the Holy Eucharist at Christmas time. These wafers were later replaced by little pieces of pastry cut in the shapes of stars, angels, hearts, flowers, and bells. In some areas the custom, was still to hang the tree upside down.

In addition to the paradise tree, many German Christians set up a Christmas Pyramid called a Lichstock – a open wooden frame with shelves for figurines of the Nativity covered with evergreen branches and decorated with candy, pastry, candles, and a star. The star represented the star of Bethlehem, the candles represented the light of Christ coming into the world, the evergreens were the symbol of eternal life, and the candy, fruits, and pastries, the goodness of our life in Christ, the fruits of the spirit, etc. By the seventeenth century the Lichstock and the “Paradise Tree” became merged into the modern Christmas tree.

Luther’s Christmas Tree

There is a popular tradition that Martin Luther was walking on a bright snow-covered, star-lit night pondering the birth of Christ. Enthralled by the evergreen trees, the stars and the landscape, he took a tree inside and put candles on it to represent the majesty he felt about Christ’s birth as Jesus came down from the stars to bring us eternal life.

 

No Leftover Thanks Object Lesson

I hope you all have a wonderful Thanksgiving This is a great object lesson for the Sunday after Thanksgiving.

No Leftover Thanks

Verse:  Ephesian 5:20 (ICB)  Always give thanks to God the Father for everything, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Supplies Needed: Tupperware Containers

Read the verse and talk about how important it is to always give God thanks. Thanksgiving to God is more important than even eating Thanksgiving dinner.

Say this in your own words:

How many of you have some of these containers in your refrigerator? I always have lots of leftovers after Thanksgiving. Name some leftovers you might have. There’s one thing I don’t have leftover from Thanksgiving though. Thanksgiving is a day set aside to thank God for his blessings. But we shouldn’t give God thanks only on Thanksgiving. When we do that, it’s like serving God leftover thanks. We should thank God every day for his blessings. 

The Only One That Can Stop You Object Lesson

Ages: K-6th Grade

Purpose: Children will learn that they are the only ones who can stop God from fulfilling His will for their lives

Scriptures:

LORD of Heaven’s Armies has spoken–who can change his plans? When his hand is raised, who can stop him? Isaiah 14:27 (NLT)

For I can do all things through Christ who gives me strength. Philippians 4;13 (NIV)

Supplies:

  • Shoe box with a lid
  • Small mirror

Preparation: Place the mirror face up in the shoe box, and close the lid.

Presentation:

Read either Scripture. Tell the students that nothing can stop God plans for you. It doesn’t matter what home they were born in or who their parents are. It doesn’t matter if their smart enough or talented enough to do what God has planned for you. Give examples of some bad things that happen in children’s lives, and talk about how even those things can’t stop God’s plans.
Tell your students about something bad that happened to you and how that didn’t stop God’s plan for you.

Even the devil can’t stop God’s plans for them because God is stronger than the devil. But there is one thing that can stop God’s plans.

Tell the students that you have the image of that one thing. You’ll let each child come up and look in the box if they promise not to tell what they saw. Have each child, one at a time, come up and look in the box.

Ask the students what they saw when they looked in the box. God is more powerful than circumstances, people, and even the devil. But He allows us to choose. He has a plan for our lives. I am the only one that can stop God’s plan for my life, and you are the only one who can stop God’s plan for your life.