3 Steps to Teaching Children How to Pray for Missionaries

Little girl wishing on white background

Teaching children how to pray for missionaries is not always easy, but here are a 3 things to help.

Give the children Prayer Maps from Every Home for Christ. They are free and will give the children areas of the world to pray for every day of the month.

Teach the children what to pray. You can’t go wrong if you teach children to pray for missionaries to have boldness, for their safety, and for God to meet their needs. Here are verses to go with those prayers.

Boldness: Acts 4:28-29 But everything they did was determined beforehand according to your will. And now, O Lord, hear their threats, and give us, your servants, great boldness in preaching your word.

Safety: Isaiah 54:17  “No weapon that is formed against you shall prosper; and every tongue that shall rise against you in judgment you shall condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the Lord, and their righteousness is of Me,” says the Lord.”

Meeting Needs: Philippians 4:19 And my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.

Teach children about specific missionaries. The more children know about real missionaries, the more likely they are to pray for them. This Assemblies of God site has stories about missionaries. You can also find some stories at this site about Christian children in non-Christian countries.

Revival Among Children

Revival is spreading throughout the nation among children. That’s what this ministry is all about, to help children’s leaders and pastors bring their students into revival. We are still booking children’s revivals, teacher training, and children’s ministry consultations this year.

For more information about booking Revival Fire for Kids, click the tab you’re interested in from the menu about or email me at revivalfire4kids [at] att [dot] net.

Here are a few pictures of our last children’s revival this past week.

Revival Celebration 1.2 Revival Celebration 2.6 Revival Celebration 1.2b Revival Celebration 2.4 Revival Celebration 2.1

 

 

Children in Revival History

Many Christians are praying for revival, but they relegate children to have a fun game night or have them watch a movie while the prayer meeting is going on. History has shown that whenever God moves in a powerful way, He always includes the children. Here’s a video from 4/14 Window Movement about the history of children in revival. This is a must watch for every children’s pastor.

You can download this video for free at this link.

The Candy Cane Object Lesson

The candy cane was invented around 350 years ago in Germany. It was originally straight and white. In 1670, a choir master in Germany bent them to look like shepherd’s staffs to hang easily on Christmas trees. The first historical reference to a candy cane in America is in 1847 when a man in Wooster, Ohio hung them on his tree. The stripes were added sometime around 1900. Although stories of an Indiana candy maker making the candy cane to incorporate symbols of Christianity aren’t true, the candy cane can still be used to teach about Jesus.

The candy cane starts with a stick of pure white, hard candy. White to symbolize the Virgin Birth and the sinless nature of Jesus, and hard to symbolize the Solid Rock, the foundation of the Church, and the firmness of the promises of God.

The cane is formed into a “J” to represent the precious name of Jesus, who came to the earth as Savior. It could also represent the staff of the “Good Shepherd” with which He reaches down to reclaim the fallen lambs who, like sheep, have gone astray.

The candy cane is stained with red stripes. Three small stripes show the stripes of the scourging Jesus received. The large red stripe symbolizes the blood shed by Christ on the cross so that we could have the promise of eternal life.